New Location in Spring for Algoma Office

Algoma Dentists reside in their new office Dentistry By DesignOur Algoma office will be moving this Spring to 1421 Lake Street, formerly Kenny Chiropractic Health Center.  Currently the building is being renovated by Advanced Home Builders and other local contractors to fit our needs.

The new location will give us increased space to operate more efficiently.  We are increasing our parking area, adding space to allow us to utilize two full-time doctors, updating all of our equipment to include: nitrous oxide in every room, modern delivery systems in our operatories, addition of a surgical suite, and expansion and modernization of our sterilization area.

We are anticipating being in the new location the end of April, beginning of May.  If you will be seeing us around this time, please call our office at (920) 487-2733 prior to your appointment to confirm our location. We hope to make this move as seamless as possible and we appreciate and thank you in advance for your  understanding during this transition.

 

What’s Up with All that Poking at My Gums during Cleaning?

Have you ever wondered why our hygienists poke at your gums during your cleaning? What they are doing is checking the depth of gum tissue pockets that surround your tooth. It’s a proactive way to identify your risk for gum disease, and when done regularly, can help catch it early. Dental probing is a pretty interesting exercise in dentistry.  It can save you from surgery and extractions, and here’s why.Dental probes used by our Sturgeon Bay Dentists, Sister Bay Dentists and Algoma Dentists of Dentistry By Design

Dental Probing Catches Problems Early

One reason to visit the dentist regularly is to identify problems in your mouth that you are completely oblivious to. Subtle changes in the health of our gum tissue can be missed by the naked eye, and some people – even those who visit a dentist regularly – can be prone to an excess buildup of plaque and tartar that can result in gingivitis and periodontal disease. Thankfully, our dental team can catch these changes early through the use of X-rays and the practice of dental probing.

The reason for probing is straightforward. As periodontal disease progresses, the visible markers of the disease (plaque and tartar) migrate down along the side of the tooth into the natural “pocket” between the ridge of the gumline. This inflames the gum tissue and widens this naturally slim gap between the tooth and gum. As this gap becomes wider, even more bacteria are allowed access to the sensitive tissue fibers along the root’s outer surface, causing more damage. This process may result in bone loss, and eventually the need to extract teeth. This is why probing is so important.

How Does Dental Probing Work?

“Probing” is quite simple and is accomplished by using a dental “probe” to measure the depth of a tooth’s pocket. The probe acts like a ruler, and has markings along its side measured out in millimeters. To measure the depth of your tooth’s pocket, our hygienist gently places the probe into this pocket and makes note of the depth. Six measurements are taken per tooth, three along the outside, and three along the inside of each tooth. A depth of three millimeters or under without any bleeding is generally accepted as healthy. Above that number, your dentist may suggest more thorough cleanings, including scaling and root planing, or something even more comprehensive if the number is above a five.

Smile Gallery

So, as you can see, maintaining pocket health is critical, and proper brushing and flossing can help clear away plaque and prevent the tartar buildup that expands a pocket. Regular visits to our office plays a critical role in ensuring you’re staying ahead of gum disease – particularly if you have been identified as having periodontitis and recommended for more frequent, thorough cleanings. With a good routine and frequent visits to the dentist the only numbers you’ll be hearing moving forward should be 1, 2 and 3! Keep up the good work.

*Article provided by Revenue Well.

 

The Link Between Dental and Heart Health

How does the health of your mouth affect the health of the rest of your body? Studies show a possible link between chronic inflammation in your mouth and heart disease, heart attack, and other diseases like stroke, diabetes, and cancer.  Inflammation occurs whenever gum disease is present and studies show that up to 75% of adults are affected. There are usually no symptoms, which is why so many people do not know that inflammation is silently damaging their health.

The mouth is home to millions of bacteria trying to invade the gum tissues all the time. When these bugs manage to penetrate the gum tissue, the immune system goes on the attack and this is when inflammation occurs. If the problems aren’t corrected, the immune system can never shut off. This creates a condition where low grade, chronic inflammation is always present, which is believed to cause damage throughout the body and increases the risk for disease.

To be healthy you must minimize inflammation and here is how to do that:

– Remove the bugs. Minimizing the number of bacteria in your mouth through proper oral hygiene procedures is critical.

– Don’t feed the bugs. The more bad stuff you eat (sugar, soda, candy, junk food, etc), the more the bacteria multiply.

– Eliminate the places where the bugs can hide. Defective fillings or crowns, decay, or cracks in the teeth provide hiding places where the bad bugs live undisturbed and there is nothing you can do to get them out. This is how a damaged tooth left untreated could be damaging your heart.

– Have gum disease treated aggressively to remove bacteria and tartar from under the gums and eliminate gum pockets.

– Live a healthy lifestyle. Poor nutrition, stress, lack of sleep, alcohol, smoking, and chewing tobacco can weaken your gum tissues and your immune system, making it easier for the bad bugs to invade.

We here at Dentistry by Design understand that gum disease and inflammation are serious health risks, and we stand committed not just to your dental health, but to your overall health as well.

Dr. Michael Pierquet our Sister Bay Dentist

Article by Dr. Michael Pierquet
(Dentist at Dentistry by Design Sister Bay)